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CSPAN
Dec 30, 2012 1:05am EST
privilege because of the long history of copyright law and this jefferson building is literally the house that copyright built. with them let me start by introducing briefly for a distinguished panel that we have. their biography in depth is online and in your brochure and tom allen president and chief executive officer of american publishers and we have james shapiro a shakespearean scholar and in the professor and vice president of the authors guild and is from columbia university. and peter jaszi professor of copyright law from the washington end college of law and is also an author and although he would not want me to was recently given the great honor by his colleagues to have a lecture named after him. congratulations. [applause] our topic is "copyright and the book" a very small topic. i want to reflect on the title because "copyright and the book" at its core is about the public interest with authors and publishers as part of the public interest. i would underscore that because sometimes in political circles it is brought up were authors and publishers are empathetic call or in th
CSPAN
Dec 30, 2012 1:25pm EST
. and i'll get to that. he graduated from lawrence university and the school of law at stanford university. he has served with distinction throughout his career, earning accolades such as recognition as the washington, d.c., antitrust lawyer of the year by "best lawyers" and as well as one of the decade's most influential shall lawyers by the "national law journal." he's currently head of the antitrust practice group, a very distinguished proud firm based in washington, arnold & porter. and there he draws and his on his 35 years of experience in civil and criminal investigation to manage that work in the area of antitrust litigation, international cartel investigations, and merger and acquisition reviews. in an earlier chapter in his life, bill baer served over several periods at the f.t.c., rising from a trial attorney general during his first term there in 1975 to serve as assistant to the chairman, then assistant general counsel, and between 1995 and 1999 as director of the bureau of competition. but here's the point that i think really speaks to the fact that bill baer's nom
CSPAN
Dec 31, 2012 10:00pm EST
people in washington usually do he parlayed his fame into lucrative law practice. he parlayed his lucrative law practice into political connections and parlayed his political connections into a john. that was the culmination of francis scott key's political career in 184 when he was appointed to be the district attorney for the city of washington. what he did in that time, i wouldn't say it was as significant as writing "the star-spangled banner" which was obviously an enduring feat but it was very important. an unknown fact about francis scott key that his best friend and brother-in-law was a man named roger taney. roger town any was like key, politically ambitious and, with key's help ascended to jobs in the administration of the andrew jackson. first key helped taney become the u.s. attorney general and then the secretary of the treasury and then in 1836, the chief justice of the supreme court. roger tawney went on to right the dred scott digs in the 1857 which effectively legalized slavery and hastened the coming of the civil war. to key and tawnye were inseparable and influen
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 9:00am EST
war ii period. the southern states were recruiting industries. they were passing right-to-work laws. they were receiving lots of funding from the federal government to build military installations at a time when the united states was involved in the cold war against the soviet union. so states like mississippi, states like georgia and texas and florida and southern california, arizona, north carolina are all being transformed in the post-world war ii period by this historic shift in population and political influence. just think about it. really does three from 1964 to two dozen eight could be thought of as kind of the carried of sun belt dominance in american presidential history. if you think about every president elected from 1964-2008 comes from a state of the sun belt. lyndon johnson from texas, richard nixon from california, gerald ford was never elected. he was not even elected vice president. he was a michigan. jimmy carter from georgia. ronald reagan from california. first george bush, texas by a connecticut. bill clinton from arkansas, and the second bush from texas. so 20
CSPAN
Dec 30, 2012 4:15pm EST
laws about privacy. when supreme court dealt with the case about gps, the supreme court didn't say, hey, we have technology, get over privacy, they said -- and this is a supreme court that doesn't agree on anything, they said privacy is important. something even this minor is where you are to give away information about whether you know it or not abortion clinic, a competitor to your bosses, this information is being tracked on the web through smart phones actually have huge ramifications. it's what we do? in europe, they actually have protective laws. you can find out what data aggregators are talking about you, if you have wrong information, you can correct it. so i might be googling diabetes or a friend or a product, and not for, it doesn't mean that i'm unhealthy, but the federal trade commission is actually considering having a do not track regulation. sort of like the do not call list. i will end up with something that the trade commission that when we were on a panel together. the chairman said that he thinks the do not track mechanism is going to be really popular. and then we c
CSPAN
Jan 1, 2013 2:15am EST
measures en bloc. the clerk: h.r. 6060, an act to amend public law 106-392, and so forth, calendar number 269, s. 302, a bill to authorize the secretary of the interior to issue right-of-way permits for natural gas transmission pipeline, and so forth and for other purposes. mr. pryor: i ask unanimous consent the bills be read a third time and passed en bloc, the motion to reconsider be laid upon the table with no intervening action or debate, and any statements related to the bills be placed in the record at the appropriate place as if read. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. pryor: mr. president, i ask unanimous consent the senate proceed to the immediate consideration of s. res. 628 submitted earlier today by senators landrieu and blunt. the presiding officer: the clerk will report. the clerk: senate resolution 628, expressing the deep disappointment of the senate in the enactment by the russian government of a law-ending -- law ending intracountry adoptions of russian children and so forth. the presiding officer: is there objection to proceeding to the measure? withou
CSPAN
Dec 30, 2012 11:15pm EST
drilling for oil and park lands and a republican wants to not pass pollution laws delude cost factories money. this is in public school. if that isn't taxation without representation, i don't know what is. [applause] >> that's the left on unreasonable and inconsistent to ensure that no one will adopt them accidentally because of their utility. they are a perfect pledge of allegiance to the lack of reason ensures the must be continually repeated as such and that every possible instance or location would be introduced by a protestation of faith or enough of the oversight. should they admit to the obsessive incantations to be repressed which is doubt buy accidentally introduced to see also the marine recruit who is or was drilled to begin each sentence response if he was instructed deutsch would offer himself for sex. this was noted by the colleges in 1921 boesh year the division will overcome by authority shocked into the compulsive confession of his willingness to submit to read as with houseguests and strangers one of the communities taxed with establishing his bonafide unhappy family w
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2012 10:00am EST
his father-in-law and next to him, his wife, rio, bill manbo's mother-in-law. they were both immigrants from japan. trained as a mechanical draftsman, but did a number of different jobs and he came to the united states and ultimately took up farming in the mid-1920s in the work of the california, southeast of downtown los angeles. they had three children. on the right is the youngest child. that is eunice. she was about 16% even this photograph. on the other hand on the left is mary, who then became mary manbo. on the left is the photographer's wife, mary manbo. and then is bill and mary sun, really. also called bill, that he was called billy and the family. he came in 1940s if this is some 10 shots in 1943. is three years old touching his toy airplane. mary went to the frank wiggins school as well. she was studying to become a seamstress. she became a seamstress and it's costing design for theater come any among other jobs. and there was a third child, a boy. by 1941, cne who is not pictured in this photograph the jamaican later was at you see berkeley in the rotc program in
CSPAN
Jan 1, 2013 6:00pm EST
that is what they find. most of the laws about campaign finance were laws that had been passed in the progressive era and you know there wasn't a lot of attention paid to campaign finance. this kind of introduces the campaign finance question very quickly. i don't think there was anything illegal. i don't think it past the smell test. i think people look at it suspiciously. by the letter cloth no he didn't do this and that was clear. one of the parts of the story that gets kind of messy, that adlai stevenson had a fund that was somewhat similar to nixon's fund and once that emerges, nixon taken money from rich guys and makes them exceptional kind of goes away. there was nothing illegal about it at the letter of the law. it doesn't pass the smell test by in most peoples's mind and the question is, is nixon influenced by the money? there are ways you can see connections between those who are giving him the money in the legislation that he had fought for as a senator up to that point in time and is a congressperson. there is clearly some sense that you have kind of pro-real estate, a
CSPAN
Jan 1, 2013 10:10am EST
-security and law and co-chairs the hoover task force on the virtue of a free society. in the past, he has served as an associate professor george mason university school small and an assistant and associate professor at harvard university. she is the author of "virtue and the making of modern and liberalism and the ethics of the moralist." he holds jd and ph.d. from science from this institution, and a and philosophy from the hebrew university in jerusalem and a b.a. in english literature from swarthmore college. norman podhoretz, who i feel silly introducing these people would still, have to. norman paul ha'aretz served as editor-in-chief from commentary magazine from 1960 to 1995, and as the current editor-at-large. he was awarded the presidential medal of freedom by george w. bush. he served as a senior fellow with hudson institute, and he was a senior fellow and is the author of many books and articles including the bush doctrine, with the president said, and what it means in world war iv, the longest struggle against the islamofacism coming and why are jews liberals which for the new
CSPAN
Jan 1, 2013 12:45pm EST
little. the results of that debate, i respectfully suggest, are thousands of pages of laws and regulations that are unlikely to forestall another financial crisis in the future. indeed, government rescues of large, insolvent firms couple with the the substantial compensation that ceos and senior managers of failed firms manage to keep for themselves mean that once the economy returns to a semblance of health, incentives to take uneconomic risks may be even greater than before. opening constructive dialogue on thesish b shoes will not -- these issues will not be easy given the current atmosphere in washington but would seem well worth the effort. thank you. >> thanks, tom. [applause] alex is going to offer a few comments. >> thanks very much to mark and cato for giving me the opportunity to comment on tom's very interesting and very useful book. i say that as having been a practicing banking executive. overbearing ceo, eh? i was a ceo for about 14 years. i wonder if i was overbearing? surely not. tom in his book cites frank knight's risk uncertainty and profit, a deservedly famo
CSPAN
Dec 26, 2012 12:45am EST
. but now i see it on the positive trend. >> they seem to agree. >> the rule of law committee for the ocean. it is said that geography is one of the most important factors because it is the most permanent. we saw the arctic icecap drop and it appears to be opening more this session. what does this trend mean in a generation for russia and canada? >> i did go to zero chapters to it in the book. he is very provocative. in the middle of roberto they predicted china who was our ally would become our adversary geographically. also he said united europe could be a competitor for the united states. with the arctic icecap, if the arctic was open for shipping and a friend would sail the northwest passage up green land and across canada that shipping in the northern arctic that could provide alternative routes that is somewhat less of an emphasis of the indian ocean. to bring russia closer to america fundamentally. it would make canada significant you have shale guest, the tar sand and the hydropower resources with open arctic it would be that much more significant. >> i would like to offer a q
CSPAN
Dec 30, 2012 1:00pm EST
those nominees the kind of underpinnings where the laws allow capital to flow to the mortgage markets through various entities and numerous entities so the whole burden doesn't have to be borne by the insurance of f.h.a. and the united states government. so i rise with pleasure to say that i will vote in favor of carol galante for commissioner of f.h.a. and i yield back. a senator: mr. president? the presiding officer: the senator from tennessee. mr. corkerer: thank you, mr. president. i rise to speak behind the distinguished senator from georgia, who knows all things housing, has more experience in the housing market than any senator in the united states senate and always speaks with eloquence and balance. and i just want to second what he said. i've spent a lot of time with the nominee, carol galante. she is technically very proficient. mr. president, just over the last two weeks, she has put in place reforms that are very, very strong. they're just a start and i know that a lot more needs to happen at f.h.a. but she's put in place some very significant reforms. one of the things th
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 7:00pm EST
initially russians in 1922. a first step in the development of international refugee law policy. the international office of refugees who won the 1938 nobel peace prize. he yearns to -- diaspora and he was the russians could do something that can to the inspiring recent flight across the atlantic. in 1928 he decided it was up to him to do a tattered to mail in equivalent to go around the world alone by bicycle. luckily he didn't have to do that. he departed shanghai on a better bicycle but upgraded to a new bicycle in bangkok into a secondhand motorcycle in singapore. the benefactor gave him a brand-new aeriel motorcycle in karachi plus a letter the guaranteed parts and assistance in aerial offices around the world. in his published a county think the worldwide services of the ymca ,-com,-com ma shell oil and the firestone company and he depended on the global availability of gasoline, oil and food. the array of industry of good services that were now spread almost everywhere in the world. like the circumspect wing south asian diaspora he made his transit with think richmond of scatt
CSPAN
Dec 30, 2012 3:00pm EST
opposition than his programs on race. congress had passed a law forbidding women to serve on fighting ships or in fighting planes. so by law women did not serve on an equal basis with men. women were also not permitted to attend service academies. at this time it was legal only to assign women to hospital or transport ships. bud understood that the culture believed women should avoid aggressive activities, but once again he took another view, and here's his view. i want to quote it. i have no problem supporting women in combat for two reasons. one, i remember well my grandmother's stories about fighting off the indians along with her husband as they crossed the plains and, two, the most vicious and cunning enemy i ever had to fight was a viet cong woman. close the quote. so in 1971 bud formed one of these wave retention groups. retention groups were these groups that he created to study problems in the navy; race relations, women in the navy, etc. and these, this wave retention group revealed general dissatisfaction with the reality that women were still being assigned primarily as re
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 5:00pm EST
so that the rest of us can feel safe. my son-in-law is currently on the pace of deployment and my daughter in the special operations and my heroes. fear is part of their everyday. although my name is in writing this chapter in the book i cannot take all the credit. i was still so broken at the time i was asked to write in a difficult expressing myself. there is input for my husband, gary, matthews wife theresa who was his high school sweetheart and worked with him on the student council and his naval academy friends. matthews story would not have been written without their input and i deeply thank them for all of their input. this book, "in the shadow of greatness" will help america to better understand the sacrificey and the courage of the brave men and women in the families of the greatest military force in the world. freedom is not free. god bless our military families in god bless america. [applause] [applause] [applause] >> thank you ,-com,-com ma lisa. thank you mrs. freeman. war brings sorrow and weakness, but through the challengechallenge s we face over the past 10 years,
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 7:15am EST
telecoms, it might be the network of a law firm that perhaps, you know, only spans from new york to los angeles. it might be a network like facebook or google. but what's striking and necessary to understand the way it manifests itself physically is that networks carry networks. you might have a global backbone company like a level three or a tata that own the strands of glass and that own the conduits that might run perhaps beside railroad tracks across the country. you might have another company, sort of a mid-sized network services company, one called hurricane electric, that might actually illuminate those strands of glass. they might own the light. ask and then you might have a goldman sachs or large law firm that buys bandwidth on that glass. so it's, you know, we often talk about b the information superhighway as if the network itself were the highway. i hike to think of it more -- i like to think of it more that a given network is a car chugging along the highway side by side with other networks because there's definitely a layering going on that's crucial to understanding the w
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2012 12:00pm EST
laws but there were also very strong isolationist sentiment in america. and even george marshall, who was chief military advisor to franklin roosevelt said, how can we send all these weapons to england if they're going to surrender to the british in a matter of weeks, and we end up fighting the germans? we will be charging into the face of our own weapons. but even though the operation was secret, it became headlines of course when it happened around the world. and everyone knew about it. and roosevelt and marshall were very, very effected by this. they thought if the british government can do this, they are serious. they are not going to negotiate with the germans. they're going to stay in this for as long as they possibly can. and it opened up the pathway for armaments to go to britain, which were very much needed and very much appreciated. >> brooke stoddard, when the official date of the so-called battle for britain, battle of britain? >> when were they? i think britain calls it july to the end of september, let's say. >> of 1940, which is essentially -- >> that's right. >> the se
CSPAN
Dec 26, 2012 12:00am EST
to the law and order. many were heated arguments almost a danger point. local author polly jacobson wrote of it. when i first started working in san francisco in february of 1850, sawyer continued, i wanted to be an engineer on a steamer. mark twain nodded in disapproval but got sidetracked in performing the honest business of fighting fire and training a gang of ragtag adolescent boys. the city needed volunteers and runners. sawyer's life saving acts of courage aboard a steamboat, which mark twain had a particular horror, awaken the journalist at night and set him shaking cloud of cigar smoke. for that reason he had sweat rolling down his brow. his story of fire and explosion on board the steamboat independence. in which hundreds died. the steamer was launched in new york city on christmas day of 1850. it did not reach sentences go for the first time until september 17, 1851. a white trail almost abandoned. between houses peer and clay street wharf. the exhaust steam escape into the air like a virginia city hot spring. i'm going to leave out the shipwreck, which is pretty horrible.
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2012 6:00pm EST
popular majority in getting laws changed from state to state to state in which providing for universal white male suffrage, which took a vote out of the hands of property owners and give it to barbarians as john quincy adams may say. the bank if there was a deal with clay in 1824, was that ethical bystanders of those days and retrospectively by our standards? >> is certainly what is ethical in those days. he took a lot of flak for it, but the choice in his mind was to turn the country over to a barbarians who couldn't write his name, who had violated the constitution that will turn the word of 1812, con into massacre in the seminal sender and enduring whatever he felt like doing. he did not want to see this man president. >> one point in the book he described a bit of a crouch. teaching to afflict him as a person? >> yes. >> there is some time travel involved. >> all of us are brooches at times. he did not suffer fools, so you would be grouchy. i was grouchy last night when romney said we have fewer ships today than we had in 1917. i was grouchy when obama said some mean. joh
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 1:30pm EST
documenting and researching but also working practically on the human trafficking. president laws of the clinton global the initiative announcing a major new direction on this topic and there are many people that work on this topic to have helped move it forward on the agenda but one of them as a lot of credit. >> we've been talking with philip auerswald, the coming prosperity, entrepreneurs are transforming the global economy. his most recent book. book tv on location at george mason university. >>> now on book tv, alex berezow argues that while antiscience is usually a term associated with conservatives, the left in the united states has plenty of problems with science when it comes to issues they don't support. it's about an hour and a half. >> my name is kenneth agreement and a resident scholar here at the enterprise institute and i work on primarily energy and environmental policy issues. i'm a scientist as well as alex and my doctoral degree is environmental science and engineering. so i am really excited to have this event today on science called "science left behind," alex's grea
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2012 12:30pm EST
ensuing years but the watershed event was when president nixon signed into law -- created the environmental protection agency. one of the first orders of business of the ecb the a was to ban a series of insecticides starting with ddt and including all of its cousins, many of which were more toxic than ddt. the domestic ban went into effect in 1972. began phasing them out and it is too bad carson didn't live to see that but she didn't and i like to think of her in this photograph taken by her friends the freeman family who lived next door to her in maine on the shoreline of southport island in 1955, of my favorite photographs of her. she looks very content in this picture and someone who was at home in that environment and at home in the world and at home in her role as an author, scientist and ultimately somebody who would change the way we think about things. that is a good place to stop and take any questions you have. >> anybody have any questions? >> why was the book called "silent spring"? >> why was the book called "silent spring"? that probably stems from the opening ch
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 1:00pm EST
supervisor and refer to a worker who as a nigger or black people as niggers may be in violation ofhe law creating a hostile workplac and thereby making yourself t subject to liability under thetl 1964e call or under the civil-rights law of 1964. so, under certain circumstancess you can would make yourself -- which subjects yourself to legal liability, or another way. if you commit violence and in the indication of a -- the commission of a violent act refer to people using the n-word, you might be subject to hate law legislation, and thereby not only be prosecuted for assault or whatever violent act you have committed, but you might subject yourself to an enhanced penalty by running afoul of state hate laws. so, under certain circumstances, yeah, you would be in violation of the law. generally speaking, though, because of the strong shielding power of the first amendment, people, for instance, comedians or writers, can use the n-word and not have to fear the law, though you might have to fear a public opinion which itself can be a very powerful force. >> host: is that the near word versus
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 6:45am EST
. >> you're a law professor correct? so the courtroom drama part, did that come easy to? >> i don't know, for me no novel is really easy to write but it is true, this would fit into some of my interests as a scholar. i write about presidential power. i write about war. i've written a lot about lincoln over the years, and so taking that come those ideas, put them into fiction but if you think about it, lincoln did do things during the civil war that raise interesting questions. lincoln did suspend habeas corpus. in some cases subject to the military court-martial. my notion was what if a different process used for political reasons, nevertheless got us into the war as a way of trying to get them out of the way. >> how much political pressure was abraham lincoln under in early 1865? >> lincoln was the most talented politician i believe whoever inhabited the -- not the oval office. there was a one, but the presidential office at the time. he had to balance these competing factions of his own party. he had to run the civil war while trying to maintain his own presidency. all through the pres
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2012 10:45pm EST
important it is to know. [applause] >> next from the georgetown university law center in washington, d.c., a discussion on the supreme court. it's about one hour and ten minutes. >> hello, everyone. i want to welcome you to today's program, which features an all-star lineup of authors who will be discussing their most recent books on the supreme court. i am a professor here at georgetown and executive director of the supreme court institute. it's a real privilege for the supreme court institute to host this event and i would like to thank our deputy director for putting it all together. before i turn the program over to our moderator i would like to remind everyone that after the program we have a reception following in which he will get a chance to have all of your newly purchased books signed by the authors and have a word or two with the authors hopefully coming in as you can see, we have food and beverage, so please stick around after the program. with that, i would like to introduce our moderator for today's program. tony really needs no introduction at all sali will keep it sh
CSPAN
Dec 29, 2012 2:05pm EST
as you may or may not know because of the long history of copyright law in the library of congress this jefferson building is quite literally the house that copyright bills. let me start by introducing briefly the distinguished . let me start by introducing briefly the distinguished panel that we have. to my left is tom allen, former congressman from maine and chief executive officer of the association of american publishers. to his left his james shapiro, who is a professor of english and a shakespearean scholar and an author and vice president of the author's built, a professor at columbia university. thank you for coming down from new york. did you also come down from new york? from washington. you are everywhere. then we have peter jaszi, professor of copyright law at the washington college of law, american university, also an author. i will say also peter would not want me to, recently given the great honor by his colleagues at the washington college of law to have a lecture named after him. congratulations and thank you for joining us. [applause] so our topic is copyright and
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 8:30pm EST
recover the lawful property of southern families, namely their slaves. and there was no compromise that could erase those tensions. they had been trying to compromise the issue of slavery for three generations. they compromised over slavery when they wrote the constitution. they compromised over slavery when they passed the northwest -- opening the upper midwest. they compromised over slavery in 1820 with the famous missouri compromise. they compromised over slavery in 1850 with the fugitive slave act and in 1854 with the kansas/nebraska act. the dred scott opinion of the supreme court was supposed to be compromised, resolving the issue of slavery. they had tried and tried and tried to compromise. it had not worked and that is why the crisis came. if one nation sharing the same congress, operating under the same laws, could not compromise the issue, how could two nations side-by-side, sharing these vital arteries of commerce and communication, how could they hope to resolve the issue? and what's more, lincoln understood that if secession managed one success there would not be illog
CSPAN
Dec 23, 2012 11:00pm EST
private service of the mine which is illegal by the way under the u.s. law. they were busted by the clinton administration, stripped of insurance, but they have henry kissinger on the door, so they got everything worked out. this has 18,000 people working at 15,000 feet. straight down through glacier. it's the biggest gold mine and basically the biggest cotton - the world. but, people are shocked. there's a huge battle going on because they're putting 300,000 tons of waste every single day in the two rivers without, like in america you can't do that. but there you just play with on and it doesn't matter. so, what you are asking is to be pushed off and if you do you push it puts a to china who doesn't care. yeah it's much worse. at the bottom line is america is actually good about mining in terms of world standards we have the highest standards really of safety the you are talking about huge amounts of toxic metals that they admittedly don't know how to control. it is in the they don't want to be and i do not think they are evil by nature they just don't know how to do at. in arizona
CSPAN
Dec 31, 2012 3:30pm EST
, it's social service programs, it's against, it's homeland security, it's law enforcement. that's about a third of our budget. and it's not the part of the budget that's driving this -- it's not a part of the spending budget that's driving the deficit and debt much that's being driven by the growth in entitlements, which are becoming particularly for a good reason, which is that the american people are living longer, therefore taking much more money out of programs like medicare than they put in, and i suppose for reasons that are not so good, which is the cost of health care continues to go up. so we proved ourselves incapable of dealing with this crisis as part of the normal process of compromise, and so we created this cliff which was intentionally made so harmful that our assumption was that we would not allow ourselves to go over the cliff. because it would be so hurtful. and, again, that's why i say no deal, in this case, is not better than a bad deal. no deal is the worst deal because it means we go over the cliff. why isual thi is all this happe? for a lot of reasons. but
CSPAN
Dec 31, 2012 10:45am EST
godfather was cardinal james gibbons of baltimore. he was educated at yale university and yale law school and immediately entered the navy where he received the purple heart for his service in the pacific theater. the awful immediacy of his war experiences made him a man who was dedicated to making every feasible effort to achieve peace. after he was discharged at the end of war, he worked as "newsweek" magazine, and in that job came into contact with joseph kennedy sr. who asked him to manage the merchandise mart in chicago. during those chicago years, he married the boss' daughter, eunice, in 1953 and chaired the chicago school board and the catholic interracial council as a supporter of desegregation of the city's schools. shriver's prominence in the commercial and social life of the state soon led to interest on the part of the political leaders to nominate him for governor of illinois. but by then his brother-in-law, john kennedy, was running for president. shriver served as kennedy's chair for illinois and also headed the campaign's civil rights division. in that capacity late in th
CSPAN
Dec 29, 2012 12:00pm EST
not diminishing the skill that these jobs required. i mean, some of my law school classmates, roommate, they say i was completely inept in making anything. ironic i wrote a book on manufacturing. i can write a brief, but i can't assemble a machine. it doesn't mean my skills is different or any better, its own market value, but somehow we frowned upon or don't appreciate the complexity of the skills required in the trade, and i think we need to both educate on technology and also have a real respect for how difficult the jobs are. >> you mentioned the importance of sustaining efforts to technology oriented education. which of our other current manufacturing facilitation initiatives do you think are really critical for us to sustain and what new initiatives would you suggest in order to stimulate our entrepreneurial success? >> great question. the partnership, a small program, but it's not well-known at the department of commerce, and what they do is they help companies figure out how to become more efficient. they figure out how to economize their production process or how to
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 8:30am EST
in favor of the arizona law that's derided by some as the papers, please, law. and he's against the original dream act. and so those are positions that he will be pressed about as his national profile rises and that he'll have to reconcile if he wants to scoop up a whole lot of hispanic votes and bring them to the republican party. >> host: mr. roig-franzia, the mormon aspect of marco rubio's childhood, what did you discover about that, and can you walk us through that? >> guest: it's so interesting that he has a mormon background at all. and when he was being talked about as a possible vice presidential candidate, some people were saying, wow, could it be an all-mormon ticket? because mitt romney was mormon. that's a little bit of an overgeneralization there. here's the situation. marco rubio was born catholic, grew up in miami, and his family moved to las vegas. they moved to las vegas because he had an aunt and uncle who lived there. his mother's sister. and this is a pattern that we see with immigrants. they follow tear family members -- their family members, right? so it was lo
CSPAN
Dec 29, 2012 3:00pm EST
junior position in law and social science of what he wrote to the ranks about the institution to become a tech executive. the cultural nature of human development, the accidental gorilla, peggy pascoe's book on law and race in america. daniel walker and his history of america between 1815 and 1848. ladies and gentlemen, niko pfund. anna. >> thank you very much for coming here. for listening to us talk friday afternoon. i'm so that we chose to spend your afternoon with us. i have spent 10 years working for a library in and spent about half of that time physically working in a library. as a director of nyu press, i am thrilled to be here and to talk to you about publishing. i was asked to give you a quick overview of our philosophy. it sounds a little pretentious, but i would say that in terms of how i look at what we do, it is squarely driven by the message of oup. we often say that we don't exist to make money, but we do have to make money to do the things that we exist to do. it really doesn't want form all the work that we engage in. personally, one aspect of what we do and it
CSPAN
Dec 31, 2012 1:30pm EST
have things like our federal law enforcement. with our federal law enforcement, if, in fact, we go into this meat ax approach, over 7,500 positions -- because it will come out of personnel -- will be affected. this could affect as many as 3,000 federal agents. 3,000 federal agents of the f.b.i., d.e.a. and a.t.f. now, they might not be laid off but they're going to be furloughed. they're going to have short-term furloughs. this is going to have a direct impact on morale, a direct impact on mission and it will have a direct impact on protecting the american people whether it's from cyber threats, border control threats, all the things that they do. the federal bureau of investigations, the department of drug enforcement, these are absolutely important. then the other area is in homeland security. we could reduce the mission hours at the coast guard by as much as 50%. now, the coast guard is absolutely crucial related to drug addiction -- interdiction dicks, not addiction, drug interdiction, and also protecting our boarders from our waterways. a lot of people love the weather channel
CSPAN
Jan 1, 2013 6:45am EST
point has the joint chiefs into his office and they basically tried to lay down the law and said mr. president, we don't like the way your prosecuting the war. he curses them out in the most vulgar terms, which i won't use because c-span will get mad, and the chiefs leave. casino says i've never been talk to like that in my life. well, at that point, you put your stars on the table and say, mr. president, you have clearly lost her confidence in me, i am out of here. that's what george bush would have said had fdr spoken like that to him. we know this because once when douglas macarthur told that with roosevelt, roosevelt said douglas, you must not talk to the president like that. so these guys had an understanding back then that we seem to have lost in our senior leaders later on that their job is to speak truth to power. even when it's uncomfortable, especially when it's uncomfortable. >> that's why want to come right back to the iraq war and the current iraq war, and ask you why you think it is, i think, to the extent that has been blamed come a portion, it has rested mostly with
CSPAN
Jan 1, 2013 8:00am EST
honorary documents from syracuse university and the john marshall law school and accuracy in media award for excellence in journalism. please join me now in welcoming our panelists. [applause] >> would you like to start? >> such a pleasure and honor to be here once again. i was flattered to be asked to participate in the first seminar last year and i didn't do too badly because i am back today. and icy some good friends out here and also some people including senator jim buckley and he deserves a round of applause. [applause] >> let us begin with a paradox. whitaker chambers was a soviet spy who became in bill buckley's words the most important american defector from communism. chambers's public witness about the seductive attractions of communism and its treasonous adherents began in august of 1948 when he identified alger hiss, a bold employe of the liberal establishment as a fellow member of his underground communist cell in the 1930s. this was a former assistant to secretary of state and adviser to president franklin d. roosevelt, the acting secretary general of the united nati
CSPAN
Dec 30, 2012 9:45am EST
is very easy to mobilize the youth who sit at the feet of the moon law at the schools and to take orders, who believe that [inaudible]. of the cleric in charge. the politics of nigeria became complicated, simply because of something the british did. they were not satisfied. there had to be dissension, division in the sense of the political power in the country. so when the british left, before the left they created -- [inaudible] and naturally they wanted closest to their viable or already practicing a kind of structure, which is close to what the british practice at the time until later in the year. and so they not only falsified the elections that followed, preceded independence. they falsified even consensus. now, if you check the annals of home office, so-called home office, which is where the colonies are ministered, look for the book of harold smith was one of the civil service in nigeria at the time. he was in the white house and he got into trouble because he not will -- he did not want to carry out those orders. but falsification of the first elections. .. which is staged
CSPAN
Dec 31, 2012 8:30am EST
laws. and hollywood had brought in will rogers who had been in the harding cabinet and was, you know, mr. protestant. and kennedy now positioned himself as the heir protestant, the non-jew. and he made himself indispensable to the industry as such. and studio after studio hired him. at one point he ran four major studios. and at each of those he demanded to be paid in stock options. by the time he left hollywood after only a couple of years, he was a multimillionaire because he knew how to manipulate those stock options. he knew how to turn those pieces of paper into dollars, millions of dollars. and he did. at age 50 having learned how to make an advantage of a disadvantage, at age 50 he had those millions and millions and millions of dollars. and at age 50 he knew the way the stock market worked, the way stocks and bonds are traded, and he knew that a crash was coming, and he pulled out all his money so that when the crash did come, he was left with his millions. in a extraordinary position. and yet with that crash, with that crash -- we're suffering from a recession now, and a lot
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2012 10:00pm EST
so many tough laws about stock trading, that when he was finished, he had a stock trading stocks and took his money out and put it into real estate. the way he made money he had now outlawed. [laughter] he went on to be the first irish american ambassador to great britain, as i said before. the first and probably the worst ambassador this country have seen. he did everything he possibly could to appease hitler. even when neville chamberlain, the author of the munich agreement, said that you cannot make a deal with hitler. kennedy kept trying. he returned to this country in 1940 in disgrace because he had made it clear that no american dollar support the british because they were going to get defeated. the only way americans could survive, he thought, was to make a deal with the germans and italians and japanese. but he said war would destroy the country, the united states. we would go back into depression, capitalism would be threatened. democracy would also be threatened. he became a pariah and an outsider in 1940. the last remarkable chapter of this man's life, from 1940 to 1960, t
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 11:00pm EST
. towns all across the country in states across the country are beginning to institute censor laws in hollywood had rotted will rogers would then departing cabinet and kennedy now positioned himself as the non-jew and made himself indispensable to the industry as such. studio after studio hired him. at one point herein for major studios in at each of those he demanded to be paid in stock options. the time he left hollywood, he was a multimillionaire and he knew how to manipulate the stock options. he knew how to turn those pieces of paper into dollars, millions of dollars and he did. at age 50 learned how to make an advantage the disadvantage and had this millions and millions and millions of dollars. at age 50 he knew how the stock market were permanently stocks and bonds are treated and he knew the crash is coming up or that all his money so when the crash did come coming here is blessed with his million and extraordinary positions. and yet, with that crash will recess. from the recession now. we all know people who are suffering, but it doesn't compare to the depression of the 30s.
CSPAN
Jan 1, 2013 5:00pm EST
like final passage in that this is before something becomes law and goes to the president's desk. and here again, we see rarely used until the early 1970's and then explosion. and then not for deep personal principle but for paralysis. i have found it quite interesting to hear some of my colleagues say, this was the constitutional design, the senate be a supermajority chamber. that is beyond out of sync with american history or any -- any facts. and they say, well, isn't there a story about george washington talking with thomas jefferson and george washington says, "you know, the senate's meant to be the cooling saucer and, therefore, wasn't the senate always a supermajority body?" and the answer is, well, no. it wasn't a supermajority body. as i've demonstrated by these charts, it was very rare before 1970 to oppose a final majority vote. and when it was done, it was done for principle. and when it was done, people took this floor -- they didn't have to but they took this floor and they explained themselves to their colleagues and the american public. because the framers were very su
CSPAN
Dec 31, 2012 10:00am EST
. this reinforced a second exceptional pillar, common law, which posits that god-given, or the laws given from god to the people and it bubbles up word to the rumors. it gives us the government of the people, by the people and for the people that lincoln referred to. common-law stand in stark opposition to almost every other nation on earth that has developed some form of civil law come in which law trickles down from the top. both germany and england had common-law for a while, but by the 20th century both have more or less abandoned it. germany more so than england. therefore, by the end of world war ii, when you have unloaded however unwillingly its colonies, those colonies were themselves designed on principles of civil law. us, the first two pillars taken together mean that a christian, protestant religion influenced and shaped everything about american foundation of laws and defined its system of personnel rights. it wasn't just that the united states was a democratic republic, but that the very premises of what a democratic republic meant were likely to be far different in the unit
CSPAN
Dec 29, 2012 7:00pm EST
of raw space and time. the board must of gotten to you, i tell you, it defies the laws of logic. i have been sitting there across the table from you forever. i have kept my eyes peeled, and there never has been a pin prick of any kind. once more, this wacky stuff, you crawl space and time has never existed either. nor will it ever exist. why is that? because nothing comes of nothing. zero upon zero equals zero. the idea that the basic facts could ever change is ridiculous. it defies the first law. the law of the conservation of energy. every respectable scientists will understand, why live, in exasperation and trying to get simple objects across to you, infinitely smaller than a pinprick infinitely shows its head. suddenly, a call of singularity. this just does not make sense. act as if nothing has happened. meanwhile, that pinprick blows up so fast that it makes me dizzy. and it has three properties that never existed before. three properties that are common sense prevailed should not exist. those properties are time, space, and speed. how in the nonexistent world to the nothingne
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 1:00am EST
the civil-rights act was enacted into law the. >>host: at what point* did you become aware of the civil-rights commission? >>guest: i became aware when i was in a graduate program they would ask me if i would in the '60s and '70s. they were very good reports. i was very much aware. and the commission asked me to ask if i would write something with abortion rights and let history had been and i did a report for them. >>host: what is your history? >> what to stage where you from? >> i am from asheville my family and their relatives are there. when i went to howard university for seven to the history department with a ph.d. then to the law school to do legal history. then you had to get both degrees but not at the same time. but now that you can. [laughter] i had to do one then the other. >>host: did you come north to graduate school on purpose. >>guest: howard. absolutely. with those negros is we were called i went to howard. that made sense but one of the first to announce that was black in the ph.d. program. they said they were surprised to see me. onetime bay negro came years ago
CSPAN
Jan 1, 2013 2:00pm EST
those children, that too was renewed for another five years. and a provision in the law which was added by senator schumer of new york years ago which helps working families to pay for college education, that too was included in this measure. so from a working family perspective, there are many good and important elements that were included in this measure. we also considered a lot of other tax measures, some of which i liked and some i didn't like. one of them in particular, the estate tax, is a tax that is widely misunderstood. this is a tax which applies to the very, very small fraction of a percentage of american families that when the breadwinner passes away have a valuable estate that can be subject to federal taxation. it is a very small percentage. some 3% might be affected by an estate tax and at the higher levels that we've discussed in our debate on this issue, less than 1% of estates end up paying any tax whatsoever into the federal government. the republicans insisted on a provision which senator kyl of arizona had been championing for years which would raise the exem
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 9:45pm EST
law. but you have now, and i don't blame people who show up here. if we refuse to control the border and identify who you are and refuse to police ourselves refuse to do everything if you're here illegally, it's hard for me to tell you you're or taken advantage of the richest venture in the world. he seems to be saying please come and exploit me. to some extent we have to reestablish the rule of law. the only point to try to make during the debate that had a significant impact on our side in solidifying the degree to which people adopt positions that made no sense. two points. one is for not going to deport grandmother's. some of you may disagree with that, but if you look at this country as a whole, the idea behind grandmother's, the churches will protect them. their families will protect them. and they cannot pin. conservatives should not write laws that are fantasies. i didn't say i'm for people who come here illegally, but i'm prefiguring out a patch of residency to get them to pay taxes, get them to be within the law, get them to be not exploited and ends this. we will never app
CSPAN
Jan 1, 2013 12:00am EST
cynical, said he was completely innocent. most of the law about campaign finance were laws that had been passed in the progressive era and there wasn't a lot of attention paid to campaign finances. this kind of introduces the campaign finance question very quickly. i don't think there was anything illegal. i don't think it passes the smell test. people looked at it suspiciously. by the letter of the law, it wasn't illegal. and that was clear. and one of the parts of the story that gets messy is that adlai stevenson had a fun that was somewhat similar to knickson's fund and once that emerges, nixon is taking money from rich guys and that makes him exceptional, goes away. there's nothing illegal about it by the letter of the law. doesn't pass the smell test, and the question is, is nixon influenced by the money? there are ways to see connection between those who give him the money and the legislation he fought for as a senator up to that point and as a congress person. there's clearly some sense that you have kind of rowe real estate, antipublic housing policies that nixon was doing t
CSPAN
Dec 26, 2012 3:00am EST
daughter of a wealthy man. when that man with his father-in-law died inherited three slaves. the first lady's great great grandmother and she ended up in a rough rural community in georgia, the vast majority of people were not slave voters, white men worked the fields along the slaves they own if they owned annie and it was quite a different experience than the one we often think about. >> it was quite a different experience and i really enjoyed reading about the people of that day, how she worked the fields and the men who owned her worked the fields. i know that you were not able to determine the relationship between millvinia and the men who owned her. and i also know, code of silence. she never talked about it and her descendants never talked about it. i noticed the same thing in her own family and other families as well. it is about wilkerson who wrote about the great migration, the same code of silence in her family. what is up with that code of silence? >> this is a painful chapter of american history for many families. so i think at the time, people knew. it would have been ver
CSPAN
Dec 30, 2012 7:45am EST
country are to violate our laws or at best to completely ignore them. are we running the risk of inculcating a culture of lawlessness? i'd certainly like to have your thoughts on how we can avoid this problem and solve this issue by not only strengthening our country, but hopefully avoiding further demise. >> well, i think whatever way we define immigration has to include control of the border and has to include some kind of worker permit system which is actually rigorously enforced. that is i happen to think you're going to ultimately end up with some kind of system that has people who are resident but not citizen and who have a work permit but are not on a path to citizenship, because i think that's a matter of -- at some point, you've got to be practical about what is doable. but i think it's very important to insure as you build that that you're actually going to enforce the law. and i don't blame people who show up here. if we refuse to control the border and we refuse to identify who you are and we refuse to police ourselves and we refuse to do anything if we find out you'r
CSPAN
Dec 30, 2012 9:00am EST
, michigan. i went to law school and became a lawyer and clerk for justice powell of the supreme court. was a lawyer and was planning to do that for my career in washington. was plucked to be general counsel of the parent company of abc back in 81. i did that for a few years. through a roundabout way i ended up becoming president of abc news. it's not something i ever saw to do. even when what to do it i did it because we need secession plant because we needed secession plan and his i thought i would do it for a couple of years. the biggest surprise was that came to absolutely love it. i've met some wonderful jobs. i've been very blessed, but been any news organization like abc news, much less running it is a rare privilege. that's part of the reason i wrote the book is, people have not had that experience, some sense what it is like. >> how do you get to go to the supreme court? what was that process? what did you learn at the supreme court that helped you run abc? >> as i said it went to michigan undergraduate, and sort of wandered into the law. i was fortunate because is a great law
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